Author Topic: Marquez v Rossi  (Read 987 times)

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Offline Simon Bond

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Marquez v Rossi
« on: October 28, 2015, 09:20:29 AM »
Well that was a surprise! Well done Danni.
Rossi says that the penalty is unjust (says Daily Star )

I would just like to mention Capirossi v Harada & Simoncelli v Pedrosa.

Still think the only (meaningful) penalty of starting from the back of the grid is unjust & excessive?

I would have straight out dis-qualified Vale.

Offline Pete Wildsmith - Administrator

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Re: Marquez v Rossi
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2015, 08:13:42 PM »
As Rossi explained Marquez has been riding lately in a manner to favour his fellow Spaniards, however Ross lost patience and pushed him wide, unfortunately for Rossi Marques crashed.
Yes Rossi shouldn’t have done that, at least not to the extent that he did.
Having watched Marquez throughout his career I have noticed in the past a rather ruthless and dangerous riding practice of his, insofar that when he runs wide on a corner, either by error or because of another riders presence, he would then cut back instantly to the apex, I have never seen any other rider do that so dramatically as Marquez does, I was shocked and concerned whenever I saw this dangerous manoeuvre. 
Brilliant as Marques is, he does appear to have an underlying dirty ruthlessness.
In order for evil to flourish, all that is required is for good men to do nothing.
- Edward Burke.
He who asks is a fool for five minutes, but he who does not ask remains a fool forever. - Chinese Proverb

Offline Simon Bond

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Re: Marquez v Rossi
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2015, 10:52:59 AM »
I would agree that Marquez is no saint but his riding has improved from his Moto2 days when he made Sufuoglu look like a choirboy.
Rossi has previous form on going in tight & running the opposition to the kerb (Beyond on occasion), but he's not the only rider who does that, it's what slows riders down when they make overtaking manouvres.
Kenny Roberts (senior) used the wide in, late apex style to some effect (it's also the police advanced riding style as it gives better visibility).
Slowing mid-corner whilst making no attempt to make the turn so as to clash with another rider is quite beyond the pale.